Variables associated with general practitioners taking on patients with common mental disorders.

TitleVariables associated with general practitioners taking on patients with common mental disorders.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsMJ Fleury, JM Bamvita, Farand L, Tremblay J
JournalMent Health Fam Med
Volume5
Issue3
Pagination149-60
Date Published2008 Sep
ISSN1756-834X
Abstract

Objective The article assesses variables associated with general practitioners (GPs) taking on patients suffering from common mental disorders (CMD).Method The study is based on a sample of 398 GPs, representative of the 7199 equivalent full-time GPs practising in Quebec, the second-largest province of Canada. GPs were asked to answer a 143-item questionnaire related to their socio-demographic profile, clinical practice, patient characteristics, perceived interprofessional relationships, quality of care, and support strategies for improving continuity of care. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed.Results This study demonstrates that the following dimensions are associated with GPs taking on patients with CMD: (1) their interest and knowledge in dealing with such patients; (2) the relative simplicity of treating CMD cases; (3) the quality of, and interest in, mental healthcare collaboration; and (4) the availability of diversified services. The main enabling variable in GPs taking on CMD patients is their interest in mental disorders. Conversely, the principal impeding variable is their positive perception of relationships with psychiatric teams.Conclusions In accordance with current healthcare reforms, this study reinforces the need to promote GP interest and training in mental health care. Increasing GP co-ordination with psycho-social services, along with developing integrated care models including specialised care, is strongly recommended.

Alternate JournalMent Health Fam Med
PubMed ID22477863
PubMed Central IDPMC2777568

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