Training, knowledge, attitudes and practices of Canadian health care providers regarding sleep and sleep disorders in children.

TitleTraining, knowledge, attitudes and practices of Canadian health care providers regarding sleep and sleep disorders in children.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsGruber R, Constantin E, Frappier JYves, Brouillette RT, Wise MS
JournalPaediatr Child Health
Volume22
Issue6
Pagination322-327
Date Published2017 Sep
ISSN1205-7088
Abstract

Background: Sleep disorders are prevalent in children and are associated with significant comorbidity.Objective: To assess the training, knowledge, attitudes and practices of Canadian health care providers (HCPs) regarding sleep disorders in children.Method: A 42-item survey, designed to collect information on frequency of paediatric sleep disorders-related screening and diagnosis, implementation of evidence-based interventions and related knowledge base, was completed by HCPs.Results: Ninety-seven HCPs completed the survey. One per cent obtained training in paediatric sleep during undergraduate training and 3% obtained such training during their residencies, yet 34.9% estimated that 25 to 50% of their patients suffered from sleep disorders. Most HCPs thought that sleep disorders significantly impacted children's health and daytime function. Most HCPs screened for developmental sleep issues, but not consistently for sleep disorders. Most recommended evidence-based behavioural interventions for behavioural sleep disorders, but some also reported behavioural interventions that were not first-line or recommended. Inadequate knowledge regarding melatonin use was evident. Most participants reported rarely/never ordering a sleep study for a child with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Most were familiar with surgical and weight loss management options for OSA; many were unfamiliar with benefits of continuous positive airway pressure. Participants' knowledge scores were highest on developmental and behavioural aspects of sleep, and lowest on sleep disorders.Conclusions: HCPs exhibit significant gaps in their knowledge, screening, evaluation and treatment practices for paediatric sleep disorders. Training at the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels, as well as Continuing Medical Education are needed to optimize recognition, treatment and follow-up of paediatric sleep disorders.

DOI10.1093/pch/pxx069
Alternate JournalPaediatr Child Health
PubMed ID29479245
PubMed Central IDPMC5804574