Relation of plasma tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy to maternal sleep and mental well-being: The GUSTO cohort.

TitleRelation of plasma tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy to maternal sleep and mental well-being: The GUSTO cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
Authorsvan Lee L, Cai S, Loy SLing, Tham EKH, Yap FKP, Godfrey KM, Gluckman PD, Shek LPC, Teoh OHoe, Goh DYT, Tan KHian, Chong YSeng, Meaney MJ, Chen H, Broekman BFP, Chong MFF
JournalJ Affect Disord
Volume225
Pagination523-529
Date Published2018 Jan 01
ISSN1573-2517
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests a relation between plasma tryptophan concentrations and sleep and mental well-being. As no studies have been performed in pregnant women, we studied the relation of plasma tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy with sleep quality, and mood during and after pregnancy.METHODS: Pregnant women (n = 572) from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes study completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at 26-28 weeks gestation and three months post-delivery. Plasma tryptophan concentrations were measured at 26-28 weeks gestation. Poisson regressions estimated prevalence ratios (PR) for the association between tryptophan and poor sleep quality (PSQI global score > 5), probable antenatal depression (EPDS ≥ 15) and probable anxiety (STAI-state ≥ 41) were calculated adjusting for covariates.RESULTS: Mean plasma tryptophan concentrations was 48.0µmol/L (SD: 8.09). Higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were associated with a lower prevalence of antenatal poor sleep quality adjusting for covariates [PR: 0.88 (95% CI 0.80, 0.97) per 10µmol/L], especially in those participants who also suffered from anxiety symptoms [PR: 0.80 (95% CI 0.67, 0.95)]. No associations were observed between tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy and postnatal sleep quality or mental well-being.LIMITATION: Subjective measures were used to assess sleep and mental well-being.CONCLUSIONS: We observed that higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were associated with a 12% lower prevalence of poor sleep quality during pregnancy, in particular among those with anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest the importance of having adequate tryptophan concentrations during pregnancy.

DOI10.1016/j.jad.2017.08.069
Alternate JournalJ Affect Disord
PubMed ID28866296

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