Predictors of healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons.

TitlePredictors of healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMJ Fleury, Ngui ANgamini, JM Bamvita, Grenier G., Caron J.
JournalInt J Environ Res Public Health
Volume11
Issue10
Pagination10559-86
Date Published2014 Oct 15
ISSN1660-4601
Abstract

This study was designed to identify: (1) predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2) correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior) and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care.

DOI10.3390/ijerph111010559
Alternate JournalInt J Environ Res Public Health
PubMed ID25321874
PubMed Central IDPMC4210995