Obesity and metabolic comorbidity in bipolar disorder: do patients on lithium comprise a subgroup? A naturalistic study.

TitleObesity and metabolic comorbidity in bipolar disorder: do patients on lithium comprise a subgroup? A naturalistic study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsPrillo J, Soh JFotso, Park H, Beaulieu S, Linnaranta O, Rej S
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume21
Issue1
Pagination558
Date Published2021 11 10
ISSN1471-244X
KeywordsBipolar Disorder, Comorbidity, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Humans, Lithium, Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, Prevalence
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorders (BD) are associated with increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Nevertheless, there is a wide range in prevalence estimates, with little known about the contributions of pharmacotherapy. It has been suggested that lithium might have a more favorable metabolic profile. We hypothesized that lithium use is associated with less increased body mass index (BMI), MetS, and type II diabetes, when compared with non-lithium users (those on anticonvulsants, second-generation antipsychotics).METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 129 patients aged 18-85 with bipolar disorder, followed at tertiary care clinics in Montreal. Patients using lithium were compared with those not on lithium, for body mass index and metabolic syndrome.RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the sample of lithium-using patients with BD was 42.4 and 35.7% respectively, with an average BMI of 29.10 (+/- 6.70). Lithium and non-lithium groups did not differ in BMI or prevalence of MetS. However, compared to the non-lithium group, lithium users had lower hemoglobin A1C (5.24 +/- 0.53 versus 6.01 +/- 1.83, U = 753.5, p = 0.006) and lower triglycerides (1.46 +/- 0.88 versus 2.01 +/- 1.25, U = 947, p = 0.020).CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome among patients with bipolar disorder. However, this did not appear to be associated with lithium use, when compared to those not on lithium. The lithium subgroup was also associated with lower prevalence of type II diabetes. Future prospective and intervention studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to further explore the association between lithium and insulin resistance, as well as its underlying mechanisms.

DOI10.1186/s12888-021-03572-w
Alternate JournalBMC Psychiatry
PubMed ID34758769
PubMed Central IDPMC8582109