The national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in Canada. Part 4: criminal recidivism.

TitleThe national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in Canada. Part 4: criminal recidivism.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsCharette Y, Crocker AG, Seto MC, Salem L, Nicholls TL, Caulet M
JournalCan J Psychiatry
Volume60
Issue3
Pagination127-34
Date Published2015 Mar
ISSN0706-7437
KeywordsAdult, British Columbia, Criminals, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Mental Competency, Mental Disorders, Mentally Ill Persons, Ontario, Quebec
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine criminal recidivism rates of a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada's 3 most populous provinces, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Public concern about the dangerousness of people found NCRMD has been fed by media attention on high-profile cases. However, little research is available on the rate of reoffending among people found NCRMD across Canadian provinces.METHOD: Using data from the National Trajectory Project, this study examined 1800 men and women in British Columbia (n = 222), Ontario (n = 484), and Quebec (n = 1094) who were found NCRMD between May 2000 and April 2005 and followed until December 2008.RESULTS: Recidivism was relatively low after 3 years (17%). There were interprovincial differences after controlling for number of prior criminal offences, diagnosis, seriousness of the index offence, and supervision by the review boards. British Columbia (10%) and Ontario (9%) were similar, whereas Quebec had almost twice the recidivism (22%). People who had committed severe violent index offences were less likely to reoffend than those who had committed less severe offences. People from the sample were less likely to reoffend when under the purview of review boards, across all 3 provinces.CONCLUSION: The results of this study, along with other research on processing differences, suggest systemic differences in the trajectories and outcomes of persons found NCRMD need to be better understood to guide national policies and practices.

Alternate JournalCan J Psychiatry
PubMed ID25886688
PubMed Central IDPMC4394712
Grant List / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada