The longitudinal effects of neighbourhood social and material deprivation change on psychological distress in urban, community-dwelling Canadian adults.

TitleThe longitudinal effects of neighbourhood social and material deprivation change on psychological distress in urban, community-dwelling Canadian adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBlair A, Gariépy G, Schmitz N
JournalPublic Health
Volume129
Issue7
Pagination932-40
Date Published2015 Jul
ISSN1476-5616
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Aging, Canada, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Social Environment, Socioeconomic Factors, Stress, Psychological, Urban Health, Urban Population
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess how longitudinal changes in neighbourhood material and social deprivation affect distress outcomes in adult Canadians.STUDY DESIGN: This study used a prospective cohort approach.METHODS: We paired data from 2745 urban participants of Canada's National Population Health Survey-who completed the Kessler 6-Item psychological distress screening tool at baseline and follow-up-with neighbourhood social and material deprivation data from the census-based Pampalon Deprivation Index. Data were paired using participants' postal code. We conducted multiple linear regression models, which were stratified by baseline deprivation level and controlled for key confounders.RESULTS: Most participants lived in neighbourhoods that did not change drastically in social or material deprivation level during the six years between baseline and follow-up. We found that a worsening of material settings was significantly associated with worsening distress scores at follow-up. This finding is discussed in the context of existing literature, and made relevant for urban health research and policy.

DOI10.1016/j.puhe.2015.05.011
Alternate JournalPublic Health
PubMed ID26112124
Grant List / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada

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