How to Find Effects of Stimulus Processing on Event Related Brain Potentials of Close Others when Hyperscanning Partners.

TitleHow to Find Effects of Stimulus Processing on Event Related Brain Potentials of Close Others when Hyperscanning Partners.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsTardif A, Chau-Morris A, Wang ZYue, Takahara E, Hadjis T, Debruille J, J Debruille B
JournalJ Vis Exp
Issue135
Date Published2018 05 31
ISSN1940-087X
Abstract

The partners of each pair must be able to pass the McGill Friendship Questionnaire without communicating. Each partner is then seated in front of a screen in one of two adjacent rooms. These rooms are separated by a glass window through which participants communicate to maintain feelings of togetherness while being fitted with the EEG cap. After checking for adequate EEG signals, the glass is covered by a curtain to prevent visual communication. Then, partners must be silent but are instructed to try to feel in the presence of their partner during the entire experiment. Just before it starts, participants are told that each of them will be presented with one image at a time and that these images will occur at the same time for both of them on their own screen. They are also instructed that, for each trial, the simultaneous images will always be different. However, unbeknownst to them, trials are randomized: only half of them are consistent with this instruction and actually include two different images. These trials form the DSC, that is, the different-stimuli condition. The other half of the trials are inconsistent with the instruction. They include two identical images and form the ISC (identical-stimuli condition). After the experiment, participants are sorted into two groups: those who reported that they felt in the presence of their partner during the majority of the trials and those who reported they did not. The impact of the stimulus processing of the partner is found by subtracting the mean voltages of the ERPs of the ISC (inconsistent with the instructions) from the ERPs of the DSC (consistent with the instructions) in at least two time windows (TWs): firstly, in the 75 to 150 ms TW, where the absolute values of these subtractions are greater, especially at right frontal sites, in those who felt in the presence of their partner than in those who did not; secondly, in the LPP time window (i.e., from 650 to 950 ms post onset), where ERPs are significantly less positive in the DSC than in the ISC in those in whom the raw results of the early (75-150ms) subtractions are negative.

DOI10.3791/56120
Alternate JournalJ Vis Exp
PubMed ID29912195

  • Douglas Hospital
  • Dobell Pavillion
  • Brain imaging centre