Good vs. poor self-rated diabetes control: differences in cardiovascular risk and self-care activities.

TitleGood vs. poor self-rated diabetes control: differences in cardiovascular risk and self-care activities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsSmith KJ, Rabasa-Lhoret R, Strychar I, Karelis AD, Clyde M, Levasseur J, Pinaroc C, Pedneault M, Schmitz N
JournalExp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes
Volume122
Issue4
Pagination236-9
Date Published2014 Apr
ISSN1439-3646
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Self Care, Socioeconomic Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

AIM: The aim of this study was to assess differences in cardiovascular risk and performance of self-care activities in people who rated their diabetes control as good or poor.METHODS: A sub-sample of 77 participants who took part in the Evaluation of Diabetes Treatment telephone interview were invited into a clinic to complete a series of laboratory examinations. Self-rated diabetes control was validated using the following laboratory markers: HbA1c, total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and LDL cholesterol. Differences in blood pressure and BMI were also assessed. Finally, all participants also completed the Summary of Self-Care activities questionnaire.RESULTS: Those people who rated their diabetes control as fair or poor had a significantly higher BMI, HbA1c levels, total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio and systolic blood pressure. When asked about self-care activities in the past week, those people who reported their diabetes control was fair/poor had spent significantly fewer days following a general diet and exercising.CONCLUSIONS: People with poor self-rated diabetes control have unfavourable cardiovascular risk and decreased performance of self-care activities.

DOI10.1055/s-0034-1367005
Alternate JournalExp. Clin. Endocrinol. Diabetes
PubMed ID24623501
Grant List / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada

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