Sleep efficiency (but not sleep duration) of healthy school-age children is associated with grades in math and languages.

TitleSleep efficiency (but not sleep duration) of healthy school-age children is associated with grades in math and languages.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsGruber R, Somerville G, Enros P, Paquin S, Kestler M, Gillies-Poitras E
JournalSleep Med
Volume15
Issue12
Pagination1517-25
Date Published2014 Dec
ISSN1878-5506
KeywordsActigraphy, Art, Child, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Language, Male, Mathematics, Science, Sleep, Sleep Deprivation
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the associations between objective measures of sleep duration and sleep efficiency with the grades obtained by healthy typically developing children in math, language, science, and art while controlling for the potential confounding effects of socioeconomic status (SES), age, and gender.STUDY DESIGN: We studied healthy typically developing children between 7 and 11 years of age. Sleep was assessed for five week nights using actigraphy, and parents provided their child's most recent report card.RESULTS: Higher sleep efficiency (but not sleep duration) was associated with better grades in math, English language, and French as a second language, above and beyond the contributions of age, gender, and SES.CONCLUSION: Sleep efficiency, but not sleep duration, is associated with academic performance as measured by report-card grades in typically developing school-aged children. The integration of strategies to improve sleep efficiency might represent a successful approach for improving children's readiness and/or performance in math and languages.

DOI10.1016/j.sleep.2014.08.009
Alternate JournalSleep Med.
PubMed ID25441747
Grant List187977 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada