The relative contributions of social cognition and self-reflectiveness to clinical insight in enduring schizophrenia.

TitleThe relative contributions of social cognition and self-reflectiveness to clinical insight in enduring schizophrenia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsBéland S, Lepage M
JournalPsychiatry Res
Volume258
Pagination116-123
Date Published2017 Dec
ISSN1872-7123
Abstract

Poor clinical insight represents a major barrier to recovery in schizophrenia. Research suggests that higher-order social cognitive abilities such as theory of mind (TOM) and metacognition contribute to levels of clinical insight. However, few studies have examined whether social cognitive abilities other than TOM are related to clinical insight. Moreover, to date, no investigation has attempted to determine whether the contribution of metacognitive ability to clinical insight can be differentiated from the contribution of higher-order social cognition, despite their conceptual similarity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relative contribution of different social cognitive abilities, as well as metacognition, to clinical insight in a large sample of 139 enduring schizophrenia patients, and controlling for established predictors of clinical insight. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to evaluate the portion of variance explained by 3 social cognitive abilities: emotion recognition, TOM, and affective empathy, and the metacognitive ability of self-reflectiveness. Clinical insight levels were assessed using the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight-Expanded version. Results indicated that affective empathy and self-reflectiveness are the strongest predictors of clinical insight. These results provide insights on the development of targeted interventions for improving clinical insight in this population.

DOI10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.082
Alternate JournalPsychiatry Res
PubMed ID28992548


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