Relations between mental health team characteristics and work role performance.

TitleRelations between mental health team characteristics and work role performance.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsMJ Fleury, Grenier G, JM Bamvita, Farand L
JournalPLoS One
Volume12
Issue10
Paginatione0185451
Date Published2017
ISSN1932-6203
Abstract

Effective mental health care requires a high performing, interprofessional team. Among 79 mental health teams in Quebec (Canada), this exploratory study aims to 1) determine the association between work role performance and a wide range of variables related to team effectiveness according to the literature, and to 2) using structural equation modelling, assess the covariance between each of these variables as well as the correlation with other exogenous variables. Work role performance was measured with an adapted version of a work role questionnaire. Various independent variables including team manager characteristics, user characteristics, team profiles, clinical activities, organizational culture, network integration strategies and frequency/satisfaction of interactions with other teams or services were analyzed under the structural equation model. The later provided a good fit with the data. Frequent use of standardized procedures and evaluation tools (e.g. screening and assessment tools for mental health disorders) and team manager seniority exerted the most direct effect on work role performance. While network integration strategies had little effect on work role performance, there was a high covariance between this variable and those directly affecting work role performance among mental health teams. The results suggest that the mental healthcare system should apply standardized procedures and evaluation tools and, to a lesser extent, clinical approaches to improve work role performance in mental health teams. Overall, a more systematic implementation of network integration strategies may contribute to improved work role performance in mental health care.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0185451
Alternate JournalPLoS ONE
PubMed ID28991923
PubMed Central IDPMC5633152

  • Douglas Hospital
  • Dobell Pavillion
  • Brain imaging centre