The "polyenviromic risk score": Aggregating environmental risk factors predicts conversion to psychosis in familial high-risk subjects.

TitleThe "polyenviromic risk score": Aggregating environmental risk factors predicts conversion to psychosis in familial high-risk subjects.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsPadmanabhan JL, Shah JL, Tandon N, Keshavan MS
JournalSchizophr Res
Volume181
Pagination17-22
Date Published2017 Mar
ISSN1573-2509
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Young relatives of individuals with schizophrenia (i.e. youth at familial high-risk, FHR) are at increased risk of developing psychotic disorders, and show higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, cognitive and neurobiological abnormalities than non-relatives. It is not known whether overall exposure to environmental risk factors increases risk of conversion to psychosis in FHR subjects.METHODS: Subjects consisted of a pilot longitudinal sample of 83 young FHR subjects. As a proof of principle, we examined whether an aggregate score of exposure to environmental risk factors, which we term a 'polyenviromic risk score' (PERS), could predict conversion to psychosis. The PERS combines known environmental risk factors including cannabis use, urbanicity, season of birth, paternal age, obstetric and perinatal complications, and various types of childhood adversity, each weighted by its odds ratio for association with psychosis in the literature.RESULTS: A higher PERS was significantly associated with conversion to psychosis in young, familial high-risk subjects (OR=1.97, p=0.009). A model combining the PERS and clinical predictors had a sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 96%.CONCLUSION: An aggregate index of environmental risk may help predict conversion to psychosis in FHR subjects.

DOI10.1016/j.schres.2016.10.014
Alternate JournalSchizophr. Res.
PubMed ID28029515
PubMed Central IDPMC5365360
Grant ListK02 MH001180 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH064023 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH078113 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States


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