Normal cognition in Parkinson's disease may involve hippocampal cholinergic compensation: An exploratory PET imaging study with [F]-FEOBV.

TitleNormal cognition in Parkinson's disease may involve hippocampal cholinergic compensation: An exploratory PET imaging study with [F]-FEOBV.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsLegault-Denis C, Aghourian M, Soucy J-P, Rosa-Neto P, Dagher A, Aumont É, Wickens R, Bedard M-A
JournalParkinsonism Relat Disord
Volume91
Pagination162-166
Date Published2021 10
ISSN1873-5126
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Severe cholinergic degeneration is known to occur in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is thought to play a primary role in the cognitive decline associated with this disease. Although cholinergic losses occur in all patients with PD, cognitive performance remains normal for many of them, suggesting compensatory mechanisms in those.OBJECTIVES: This exploratory study aimed at verifying if normal cognition in PD may involve distinctive features of the brain cholinergic systems.METHODS: Following extensive neuropsychological screening in 25 patients with PD, 12 were selected and evenly distributed between a cognitively normal (PD-CN) group, and a mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) group. Each group was compared with matched healthy volunteers (HV) on standardized cognitive scales (MoCA, PDCRS), and PET imaging with [F]-FEOBV, a sensitive measurement of brain cholinergic innervation density.RESULTS: [F]-FEOBV uptake reductions were observed in PD-CN as well as in PD-MCI, with the lowest values located in the posterior cortical areas. However, in PD-CN but not in PD-MCI, there was a significant and bilateral increase of [F]-FEOBV uptake, exclusively located in the hippocampus. Significant correlations were observed between cognitive performance and hippocampal [F]-FEOBV uptake.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a compensatory upregulation of the hippocampal cholinergic innervation in PD-CN, which might underly normal cognitive performances in spite of cortical cholinergic denervation in other regions.

DOI10.1016/j.parkreldis.2021.09.018
Alternate JournalParkinsonism Relat Disord
PubMed ID34628195