A Model of Mental Health Care Involving Trained Lay Health Workers for Treatment of Major Mental Disorders Among Youth in a Conflict-Ridden, Low-Middle Income Environment: Part I Adaptation and Implementation.

TitleA Model of Mental Health Care Involving Trained Lay Health Workers for Treatment of Major Mental Disorders Among Youth in a Conflict-Ridden, Low-Middle Income Environment: Part I Adaptation and Implementation.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsMalla A, Margoob M, Iyer S, Joober R, Lal S, Thara R, Mushtaq H, Mansouri BIssaoui
JournalCan J Psychiatry
Pagination706743719839318
Date Published2019 Mar 27
ISSN1497-0015
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), major mental disorders often remain untreated because of barriers related to access and resources. In rural areas and in conflict-ridden regions, the problem can be exacerbated by increased rates of mental illness and by reduced access to care. This paper describes a project designed to provide mental health services for major mental disorders among youth using a low-cost model in a rural district of the troubled Kashmir valley.METHODS: We describe the geographic and political context, the guiding principles and adaptation of the service model (through partnership with a voluntary organization and use of technology), and the implementation of the model using Theory of Change framework. The core of the intervention was to train a pool of lay health workers (LHWs) to provide mental health services to young (aged 14-30 years) people with major mental disorders in their own communities, supported by clinical professionals.RESULTS: Despite political turmoil and major floods, 40 (male and female) LHWs were trained. The LHWs efficiently engaged in case identification, basic interventions, and data collection on outcomes. Several different stakeholders were engaged in activities relevant to the objectives of the project; however, the use of technologies was moderated by several challenges, including access to internet services and patient preference for personal contact.CONCLUSIONS: This service model is applicable in an environment where protracted political and armed conflict, low resources, and geographical isolation make exclusive reliance on scarce professional services impractical.

DOI10.1177/0706743719839318
Alternate JournalCan J Psychiatry
PubMed ID30917693

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