Mapping the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index to short-form 6D utility scores.

TitleMapping the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index to short-form 6D utility scores.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLee L, Kaneva P, Latimer E, Feldman LS
JournalJ Surg Res
Volume186
Issue1
Pagination135-41
Date Published2014 Jan
ISSN1095-8673
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic, Female, Health Status, Humans, Least-Squares Analysis, Male, Middle Aged, Quality of Life, Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Abstract

PURPOSE: The Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) is a disease-specific quality of life instrument that is commonly used in gastrointestinal disorders. However, no preference weights, which are used to calculate quality-adjusted life years for cost-effectiveness analyses, for this instrument have been assigned. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a mapping function to derive utility scores for the GIQLI.METHODS: Patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy completed the short-form 6D (SF-6D), a preference-weighted utility measure, and the GIQLI at baseline and at 1 wk and 1 mo postoperatively. The responsiveness of the SF-6D to expected postoperative changes as well as the correlation between the SF-6D and the GIQLI was investigated. Ordinary least squares regression was performed to derive a mapping function using the baseline values, which was then validated using postoperative values. Adjusted r(2), mean absolute error, and root mean square error was used to determine model performance.RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were included in the study (mean age 51.1 [standard deviation 16.8], 28% male). The SF-6D and GIQLI domains were responsive to expected postoperative changes, and there was high correlation between the SF-6D and four of the five GIQLI domains (excluding treatment effects). The final mapping function explained 63% of the variance in the derivation sample but had relatively high mean absolute error (0.075 and 0.067 in the 1-wk and 1-mo samples, respectively) and adjusted root mean square error (13.1% and 12.0% in the 1-wk and 1-mo samples, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: The GIQLI can be accurately mapped to SF-6D preference weights at the group level but may be too inexact at the individual level.

DOI10.1016/j.jss.2013.08.006
Alternate JournalJ. Surg. Res.
PubMed ID24021906