The Influence of Gestational Diabetes on Neurodevelopment of Children in the First Two Years of Life: A Prospective Study.

TitleThe Influence of Gestational Diabetes on Neurodevelopment of Children in the First Two Years of Life: A Prospective Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCai S, Qiu A, Broekman BFP, Wong EQinlong, Gluckman PD, Godfrey KM, Saw SMei, Soh S-E, Kwek K, Chong Y-S, Meaney MJ, Kramer MS, Rifkin-Graboi A
Corporate Authorsgroup Gstudy
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue9
Paginatione0162113
Date Published2016
ISSN1932-6203
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Analyze the relation of gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels to early cognitive functions in the first two years of life.METHODS: In a prospective Singaporean birth cohort study, pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes at 26-28 weeks gestation using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Four hundred and seventy three children (n = 74 and n = 399 born to mothers with and without gestational diabetes respectively) underwent neurocognitive assessments at 6, 18, and/or 24 month, including electrophysiology during an attentional task and behavioral measures of attention, memory and cognition.RESULTS: Gestational diabetes is related to left hemisphere EPmax amplitude differences (oddball versus standard) at both six (P = 0.039) and eighteen months (P = 0.039), with mean amplitudes suggesting offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes exhibit greater neuronal activity to standard stimuli and less to oddball stimuli. Associations between 2-hour maternal glucose levels and the difference in EPmax amplitude were marginal at 6 months [adjusted β = -0.19 (95% CI: -0.42 to +0.04) μV, P = 0.100] and significant at 18 months [adjusted β = -0.27 (95% CI: -0.49 to -0.06) μV, P = 0.014], and the EPmax amplitude difference (oddball-standard) associated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and toddler Development-III cognitive score at 24 months [β = 0.598 (95% CI: 0.158 to 1.038), P = 0.008].CONCLUSION: Gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels are associated with offspring neuronal activity during an attentional task at both six and eighteen months. Such electrophysiological differences are likely functionally important, having been previously linked to attention problems later in life.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0162113
Alternate JournalPLoS ONE
PubMed ID27603522
PubMed Central IDPMC5014336
Grant ListMC_UP_A620_1017 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom

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