Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.

TitleGenome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMühleisen TW, Leber M, Schulze TG, Strohmaier J, Degenhardt F, Treutlein J, Mattheisen M, Forstner AJ, Schumacher J, Breuer R, Meier S, Herms S, Hoffmann P, Lacour A, Witt SH, Reif A, Müller-Myhsok B, Lucae S, Maier W, Schwarz M, Vedder H, Kammerer-Ciernioch J, Pfennig A, Bauer M, Hautzinger M, Moebus S, Priebe L, Czerski PM, Hauser J, Lissowska J, Szeszenia-Dabrowska N, Brennan P, McKay JD, Wright A, Mitchell PB, Fullerton JM, Schofield PR, Montgomery GW, Medland SE, Gordon SD, Martin NG, Krasnow V, Chuchalin A, Babadjanova G, Pantelejeva G, Abramova LI, Tiganov AS, Polonikov A, Khusnutdinova E, Alda M, Grof P, Rouleau GA, Turecki G, Laprise C, Rivas F, Mayoral F, Kogevinas M, Grigoroiu-Serbanescu M, Propping P, Becker T, Rietschel M, Nöthen MM, Cichon S
JournalNat Commun
Volume5
Pagination3339
Date Published2014
ISSN2041-1723
KeywordsAdenylyl Cyclases, Bipolar Disorder, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.

DOI10.1038/ncomms4339
Alternate JournalNat Commun
PubMed ID24618891
Grant List084703 / / Wellcome Trust / United Kingdom
64410 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada
MOP-13506 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada

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