Diminished insulin sensitivity is associated with altered brain activation to food cues and with risk for obesity - Implications for individuals born small for gestational age.

TitleDiminished insulin sensitivity is associated with altered brain activation to food cues and with risk for obesity - Implications for individuals born small for gestational age.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsMucellini AB, Miguel PM, Molle RDalle, Rodrigues DM, Machado TD, Reis RS, Toazza R, Salum GA, Bortoluzzi A, Franco AR, Buchweitz A, Barth B, Agranonik M, Nassim M, Meaney MJ, Manfro GG, Silveira PP
JournalAppetite
Pagination105799
Date Published2021 Nov 09
ISSN1095-8304
Abstract

While classically linked to memory, the hippocampus is also a feeding behavior modulator due to its multiple interconnected pathways with other brain regions and expression of receptors for metabolic hormones. Here we tested whether variations in insulin sensitivity would be correlated with differential brain activation following exposure to palatable food cues, as well as with variations in implicit food memory in a cohort of healthy adolescents, some of whom were born small for gestational age (SGA). Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) was positively correlated with activation in the cuneus, and negatively correlated with activation in the middle frontal lobe, superior frontal gyrus and precuneus when presented with palatable food images versus non-food images in healthy adolescents. Additionally, HOMA-IR and insulinemia were higher in participants with impaired food memory. SGA individuals had higher snack caloric density and greater chance for impaired food memory. There was also an interaction between the HOMA-IR and birth weight ratio influencing external eating behavior. We suggest that diminished insulin sensitivity correlates with activation in visual attention areas and inactivation in inhibitory control areas in healthy adolescents. Insulin resistance also associated with less consistency in implicit memory for a consumed meal, which may suggest lower ability to establish a dietary pattern, and can contribute to obesity. Differences in feeding behavior in SGA individuals were associated with insulin sensitivity and hippocampal alterations, suggesting that cognition and hormonal regulation are important components involved in their food intake modifications throughout life.

DOI10.1016/j.appet.2021.105799
Alternate JournalAppetite
PubMed ID34767841