Anxiety and Depression as Longitudinal Predictors of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.

TitleAnxiety and Depression as Longitudinal Predictors of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsFreire ACarlos Cru, Pondé MPereira, Liu A, Caron J.
JournalCan J Psychiatry
Volume62
Issue5
Pagination343-350
Date Published2017 May
ISSN1497-0015
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Few studies have dealt with the potential correlation between anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults.METHOD: This longitudinal study was conducted in the city of Montreal, Canada, with 352 older adults aged 55 years or more. The participants were interviewed at baseline and again 2 years later. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score was estimated and compared between the 2 time points, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to assess major depression and anxiety, and the K10 measured high psychological distress. Likewise, major depression, anxiety disorders, and psychological distress were evaluated at the 2 study time points.RESULTS: In older adults with a diagnosis of depression or anxiety at baseline, no significant reduction in the MoCA score indicating deterioration in cognitive function was found 2 years later. Nevertheless, in individuals with a high level of psychological distress at baseline, there was a significant reduction in MoCA scores 2 years later, indicating deterioration in cognition. The findings of the present study suggest that a high level of psychological distress in addition to environmental factors may constitute important predictors for cognitive health.

DOI10.1177/0706743717699175
Alternate JournalCan J Psychiatry
PubMed ID28346831
PubMed Central IDPMC5459229