Factors associated with emergency department use for mental health reasons among low, moderate and high users.

TitleFactors associated with emergency department use for mental health reasons among low, moderate and high users.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsMJ Fleury, Rochette L, Grenier G, Huỳnh C, Vasiliadis H-M, Pelletier É, Lesage A
JournalGen Hosp Psychiatry
Volume60
Pagination111-119
Date Published2019 Sep - Oct
ISSN1873-7714
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study identified factors associated with frequency of emergency department (ED) use for mental health (MH) reasons in Quebec during 2015-2016.METHODS: Participants (n = 115,066) were categorized as: 1) low (1 visit/year; 76%); 2) moderate (2 visits/year; 14%); and 3) high (3+ visits/year; 10%) ED users. Independent variables included predisposing, enabling and needs factors based on the Andersen Behavioral Model. Variables significantly associated with frequency of ED use were entered into a multinomial logistic regression.RESULTS: Patients with mental illness (MI), especially substance-related disorders (SRD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders; bipolar, depressive, anxiety or personality disorders; and those with severe chronic physical illness (needs factors) were more likely to use ED for MH reasons, as were male participants 18-64 years old, and those living in metropolitan areas with high social or material deprivation (predisposing factors). Regarding enabling factors, consultations with outpatient psychiatrists and not seeing a general practitioner (GP) in the year prior to ED visit were associated with high ED use.CONCLUSION: The severity of MI/SRD contributed most to frequent ED use, while social and material deprivation in metropolitan areas, and intensity of medical care also influenced ED use for MH reasons.

DOI10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.07.006
Alternate JournalGen Hosp Psychiatry
PubMed ID31404825