The effect of sleep restriction on neurobehavioural functioning in normally developing children and adolescents: insights from the Attention, Behaviour and Sleep Laboratory.

TitleThe effect of sleep restriction on neurobehavioural functioning in normally developing children and adolescents: insights from the Attention, Behaviour and Sleep Laboratory.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsCassoff J, Bhatti JA, Gruber R
JournalPathol Biol (Paris)
Volume62
Issue5
Pagination319-31
Date Published2014 Oct
ISSN1768-3114
KeywordsAcademies and Institutes, Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Causality, Child, Child Behavior, Cross-Over Studies, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Learning Disorders, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Obesity, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Phenotype, Polysomnography, Research Design, Single-Blind Method, Sleep Deprivation
Abstract

In the current paper, we first introduce the research themes of the attention, behaviour and sleep (ABS) laboratory, namely, sleep and ADHD, sleep and obesity, and sleep and academic performance. We then focus in on the topic to be reviewed in the current paper - the association between sleep restriction and neurobehavioral functioning (NBF) in typically developing children. We review the research thus far conducted by the ABS lab specific to this topic and posit the unique methodological contributions of the ABS lab (e.g. home-based assessment of sleep architecture and patterns, extensive phenotyping, etc.) in terms of advancing this research area. In the second section of the paper, we review 13 studies investigating the causal association between experimental sleep restriction and NBF in normally developing pediatric populations. Eight of the 13 studies found that sleep restriction causes impairments in neurobehavioural functioning. However, given the inconsistency in outcome measures, experimental protocols and statistical power, the studies reviewed herein are difficult to interpret. Strategies used by the ABS including implementing home assessments of sleep, restricting sleep relative to the participants' typical sleep schedules, blinding raters who assess NBF, and using valid and reliable NBF assessments are an attempt to address the gaps in this research area and clarify the causal relationship between sleep restriction and NBF in typically developing children and adolescents.

DOI10.1016/j.patbio.2014.05.017
Alternate JournalPathol. Biol.
PubMed ID25110282

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