Srividya Iyer

Srividya Iyer
 

Office: 
29-2107, ACCESS Pavilion

6625 Boulevard Lasalle
Pavillon ACCESS, Douglas Mental Health University Institute
Montréal, QC H4H 1R3
Canada


(514) 761-6131 x6219

Fax: 
(514) 888-4480



Research area: 
Clinical Research / Human Research
Psychosocial Research / Population Research

Research Theme: 
Psychosis and Neurodevelopmental Disorders


Srividya N. Iyer, Ph.D
Scientific-Clinical Director, ACCESS-Canada
Researcher, Douglas Mental Health University Institute
Clinician and Researcher, Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychosis (PEPP-Montreal)
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University



Youth mental health and early intervention for psychosis, in Canada and beyond.


Srividya’s research interests are in youth mental health and early intervention, especially in the early phases of psychosis, in Canada and beyond. These include: 

  • Development, implementation, and evaluation of models to increase youth access to timely, appropriate and engaging care 
  • Improving youth mental health outcomes
  • Early intervention, particularly for serious mental health problems such as psychosis: service models, care pathways, outcomes and predictors
  • Program evaluation and services research using quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods; engaging diverse stakeholders (e.g., service users and their families, policy/decision makers); considering multiple perspectives, particularly those of young service users and their families/carers; and examining both processes and outcomes
  • Sociocultural context and its influence on services, outcomes and stakeholder roles in the context of early intervention 
  • Mental healthcare of disadvantaged communities 
  • Building sustainable, collaborative clinical and research capacity within communities

Srividya’s program of research is supported by a CIHR Foundation Scheme grant (2015-22) and builds largely on the platforms provided by PEPP, Canada’s leading early intervention program for psychosis and ACCESS , a pan-Canadian network dedicated to improving the mental health outcomes of youths aged 11 to 25. ACCESS is the first project established under the Strategy for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (2014-20). 

Over the last several years, Srividya has also been pursuing a cross-cultural longitudinal study of outcomes and family factors in first-episode psychosis that is funded by the National Institutes of Health. This study involves PEPP in Montreal and the Schizophrenia Research Foundation, a mental health NGO in Chennai, India. More recently, she has been involved in a Grand Challenges Canada- funded project that provides mental healthcare to youth via trained lay health workers, e-solutions, and multi-stakeholder engagement in India’s Kashmir valley, a region that has been through much strife.


Malla, A., Iyer, S.N., McGorry, P., Cannon, M., Coughlan, H., Singh, S., Jones, P., & Joober, R (2015). From early intervention in psychosis to transformation of youth mental health services: An international perspective. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. In press

Iyer, S.N., Jordan, G., Joober, R., & Malla, A.K. (2015). Early intervention for psychosis: A Canadian perspective. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 203 (5): 356:64

Iyer, S.N., Boksa, P., Shah, J., Lal, S., Joober, R., Marandola, G., Jordan, G., Doyle, M., & Malla, A.K.. (2015). Transforming youth mental health: A Canadian perspective. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine (Special Focus on Youth Mental Health: International Perspectives), 32 (1), 51-60.

Lutgens, D., Iyer, S.N., Joober, R., Brown, T. G., Norman, R., Latimer, E., Schmitz, N., Baki, A. A., Abadi, S., & Malla, A. (2015). A five-year randomized parallel and blinded clinical trial of an extended specialized early intervention vs. regular care in the early phase of psychotic disorders: study protocol. BMC Psychiatry, 15:22

Pruessner, M., Faridi,K., Shah, J., Iyer, S.N., Rabinovitch, M., Joober, R., Abadi, S., & Malla, A.(2015). The Clinic for Assessment of Youth At Risk (CAYR): 10 years of service delivery and research targeting the prevention of psychosis in Montreal, Canada. Early Intervention in Psychiatry. In press.

Iyer, S.N. & Malla, A. (2014). Early Intervention in Psychosis: Concepts, Current Knowledge and Future Directions. Santé Mentale au Quebec, 39 (2), 201-30.

Jordan, G., Lutgens, D., Joober, R., LePage, M., Iyer, S.N.*, & Malla, A.* (2014). The relative contribution of cognition and symptomatic remission to functional outcome following treatment of a first episode psychosis. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 75(6):e566-72. * Senior authors

Lutgens, D., Joober, R., Malla, A. & Iyer, S.N. (2014). The Impact of Caregiver Familiarity with Mental Disorders on Timing of Intervention in First Episode Psychosis. Early Intervention in Psychiatry. doi: 10.1111/eip.12121

Iyer, S.N., Banks, N., Roy, MA., Tibbo, P., Williams, R., Manchanda, R., Chue, P., & Malla, A.K. (2013). A qualitative study of experiences with and perceptions regarding long-acting antipsychotic injectable medications: Part I -Patient perspectives. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 58(5): 14S-22S

Iyer, S.N., Banks, N., Roy, M.A., Tibbo, P., Williams, R., Manchanda, R., Chue, P., & Malla, A.K. (2013). A qualitative study of experiences with and perceptions regarding long-acting antipsychotic injectable medications: Part II -Psychiatrist perspectives. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 58(5): 23S-29S

Iyer, S.N., Ramamurti, M., Jeyagurunathan, A., Rangaswamy, T., & Malla, A.K. (2011). An examination of patient identified goals for treatment in a first-episode program in Chennai, India. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 5(4):360-5

Iyer, S.N., Loohuis, H., Joober, R., & Malla, A.K. (2011). Concerns reported by family members of individuals with first-episode psychosis. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 5(2):163-7

Pruessner, M., Iyer, S.N., Faridi, K., Joober, R., & Malla, A.K. (2011). Stress and protective factors in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis, first-episode psychosis and healthy controls: A case control study. Schizophrenia Research,129(1):29-35

Iyer, S.N., Ramamurti, M., Rangaswamy, T., & Malla, A.K. (2010). Preliminary findings from a study of first-episode psychosis in Montréal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of outcomes. Schizophrenia Research, 121(1-3), 227-233.

Iyer, S.N., Boekestyn, L., Cassidy, C.M., King, S., Joober, R., & Malla, A.K. (2008). Signs and symptoms in the pre-psychotic phase: Description and implications for diagnostic trajectories. Psychological Medicine, 38, 1147-1156.


As a researcher and service provider, Srividya Iyer’s interests are in youth mental health and early intervention, especially for psychosis, in Canada and beyond. Srividya is a researcher at the Douglas Hospital Research Centre, where she is supported by a Junior 1 Clinical-Research Scholar award from the Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Santé. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, McGill University. 

Her core interests underpin her role as Scientific-Clinical Director of ACCESS , a pan-Canadian CIHR-supported Strategy for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) network dedicated to improving the mental health outcomes of youths aged 11 to 25. As ACCESS’s Scientific-Clinical Director, Srividya provides leadership to the development, implementation and evaluation of a transformation of youth mental health services. This transformation is achieved through the early identification of needs, rapid response to help-seeking and the provision of appropriate, individualized care at 12 participating sites in six provinces and one territory. These sites serve urban, semi-urban, rural, Indigenous, immigrant, ethnic minority and homeless youths as well as youths under state protection and youths involved in the criminal justice system. She also plays a central role in creating and sustaining a vibrant collaboration among youths, families, caregivers, service providers, researchers, policymakers, Indigenous communities and community organisations from across Canada. 

Before taking on her ACCESS role, Srividya coordinated the Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychosis (PEPP), Canada’s leading clinical and research program for early psychosis. She continues to contribute to PEPP’s clinical and research activities. 

As a clinician, Srividya gained assessment and treatment experience in India, in the United States, and in Canada. Her specific clinical interests are in cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based approaches, the design and delivery of mental health services and early intervention strategies (particularly for psychosis), community-oriented case management, clinical supervision and program leadership. She is also passionate about the mental health care of disadvantaged communities. 

Srividya’s graduate students are pursuing research projects in post-traumatic growth and thriving following first-episode psychosis; perceptions among service users, families, service providers and policy makers of their relative responsibilities for meeting the support needs of people with mental health problems; early case identification approaches and their evaluation in youth mental health; physical health outcomes in first-episode psychosis; and participatory, and arts-based approaches to engage Indigenous youth in mental health services transformation. She is interested in mentoring undergraduate and graduate students, fellows and other trainees in lines of research that are related to her own.

Srividya completed her Master’s in Clinical Psychology at the University of Mumbai, India and went on to work as the sole psychologist in one of the world’s busiest public hospitals. She then pursued her doctoral training in psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of California, Los Angeles and her post-doctoral training at the Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychosis (PEPP) at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute.


Franz Veru: PhD Student, McGill University; PEPP-based research
Gerald Jordan: PhD Student, McGill University; PEPP-based research
Kathleen MacDonald: PhD Student, McGill University; ACCESS-based research
Katherine Pizarro-Wingert: Ph.D. Student, McGill University; ACCESS-based research
Megan Pope: M.Sc. Student, McGill University; PEPP-based research
Mathieu Bouchard; Intern, Ph.D. Student, HEC Montréal; PEPP-based research

Srividya's team also includes staff at the PEPP program and at ACCESS-Central, both located in the Douglas Mental Health University Institutes. Please visit PEPP and ACCESS websites for a detailed listing of team members.

Srividya collaborates with several local, national and international researchers and other stakeholders (service users, families, service providers, decision-/policy-makers) on research related to youth mental health and early intervention, especially for psychosis. At the Douglas, she collaborates with Drs. Ashok Malla, Jai Shah, Martin Lepage, Marita Pruessner, Norbert Schmitz, Patricia Boksa, Ridha Joober and Shalini Lal.


Recent Publications

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